Valentines from Days Past

by Cie McCullough Buschle on February 14, 2012

in Arts and Culture

Happy Valentines Day Albany Kids!

To help celebrate Valentines Day, here are some wonderful vintage valentines. They are all from Wikimedia Commons, and are all public domain, so please feel free to download and share. Enjoy!

If you read yesterday’s article The Odd History of Valentines Day, you might remember the name Ester Howland. She has been called “The Mother of the American Valentine”. Here is an example of one of her cards:

Esther Howland Valentine circa 1850

Esther Howland Valentine circa 1850

She later sold her business to Charles Whitney

Whitney Valentine, 1887

Whitney Valentine, 1887

Other examples of cards from the 19th century:

American valentine dated 1899

American valentine dated 1899

Late 19th Century Die Cut Valentine

Late 19th Century Die Cut Valentine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Edwardians were very found of giving valentines, especially anonymously:

Valentine postcard, circa 1900-1910

Valentine postcard, circa 1900-1910

Then the Roaring Twenties introduced mechanical cards. Some were simple paper attachments, some with grommets.

A grommet affixed to the center of the card permits the dog's eyes to glance side-to-side when the blue bow is moved

A grommet affixed to the center of the card permits the dog's eyes to glance side-to-side when the blue bow is moved

Mechanical Valentine circa 1920

Mechanical Valentine circa 1920

 

American Valentine attributed to Charles Twelvetrees circa 1920

American Valentine attributed to Charles Twelvetrees circa 1920

Also very popular were Pop-Up valentines, some very tiny:

A pop-up Valentine, circa 1920, measuring 2" x 2.5"

A pop-up Valentine, circa 1920, measuring 2" x 2.5"

 

I hoped you liked our showcase of valentines. We hope your Valentines Day is the best yet!

Happy Valentines Day

Happy Valentines Day

| Cie McCullough Buschle lives with her dog Einstein and a cat named Burton Guster. She is a lifelong traveler and enjoys researching history through holidays, toys, and everyday objects. Cie is a sculptor and co-owns The Creative Chameleon, a place where kids and adults can create, paint, celebrate, and just have a lot of fun. Sometimes you can find her time traveling back to the Middle Ages as part of the Society for Creative Anachronism.

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